Rogue gardening, seeds: round 2

The other night, in describing our gardening endeavors to some of our friends, I found myself admitting that, when it comes to our garden and as between Ken and I, I’ve “gone rogue.”  Ken, who built our planters for us based on a mutual understanding of how many plants we would have and what would be sowed where, is not happy that my penchant for late-night online seed purchasing and inability to self-limit has resulted in a whole second wave of baby plants… started from seed inside, and expecting a home out in our yard very soon.

All this aside, I’ll note that this second crop of seeds seems to be heartier and having more success.  I think it’s because we used our own soil and not the little soil pods that came with our seed-starting kit.  That stuff that came with the kit seemed stale and weird, and not as nutrient rich… and how do they get dirt to behave like a shrinky-dink anyway?  That can’t be good.

Depicted below are the baby plants a couple of weeks ago:  Mustard greens, Wrinkled Crinkled Cress (it’s actually called that… I’m not just being Seussian),  gooseberries, Ali Baba melons, kale!, more Brandywine tomatoes, radishes, leeks, red and yellow wild strawberries, two kinds of marigolds (they allegedly repel mosquitoes), and a flower called Butterfly gaura (to attract pollenators to the yard).  That’s it, I think.


I noticed that the slowest to sprout – and by a big margin – were the berries, the gooseberries and the strawberries.  It doesn’t appear to be a characteristic of fruit as compared to vegetables, because the melon sprouts came up pretty quickly.  The leeks also took a while, but my plan was to move them into the garden into the late fall… so I’m not eve sure why I started some of them from seed now.  Ken wouldn’t like to hear this.  “You mean there is absolutely no reasoned approach to any of this?!?”  And then I”d say something annoying and hippified like “My spirit needs to be free in order to successfully garden.”  …   I’m kidding, I’d never say that.

We haven’t put any of this second crop into the ground yet.  But, as you can see, the Ali Baba melons have gotten pretty big:


I’m probably most excited for kale.  The kale is doing great.  Pretty much every seed has turned into a baby plant – and they are all about the same size and lookin good.  The plan is to keep the kale in pots (as opposed to squeezing them into the raised beds – where we finally put our tomatoes last weekend!), so it looks like we’re gonna need a lot more pots… Ken.